How to Braid Hair

This Is Us star Susan Kelechi Watson proves that a massive side braid instantly enhances any look. To create, part your hair to one side and then braid the crown into a thick, voluminous braid.

Again, it will hang between the left and right strands. That is entirely up to you but if you practice daily, you'll probably get the hang of it within a week.

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How to Braid Hair. When you have little time to style your hair (or your daughter’s), a braid is an easy and quick solution, as you’ll see in this video. Braiding your hair takes only about two minutes of your time—and the only styling tools you need are a brush and a hair band.
How to Braid Hair. When you have little time to style your hair (or your daughter’s), a braid is an easy and quick solution, as you’ll see in this video. Braiding your hair takes only about two minutes of your time—and the only styling tools you need are a brush and a hair band.
Aug 31,  · The longer your hair, the more difficult it is to get your hands contorted down your back, so as to keep the braid straight down your back. If you lift the hair over your shoulder to work on it, the braid takes on a skew.
Aug 31,  · The longer your hair, the more difficult it is to get your hands contorted down your back, so as to keep the braid straight down your back. If you lift the hair over your shoulder to work on it, the braid takes on a skew.

How to Braid Hair. When you have little time to style your hair (or your daughter’s), a braid is an easy and quick solution, as you’ll see in this video. Braiding your hair takes only about two minutes of your time—and the only styling tools you need are a brush and a hair band.

Pull the sections tight to make sure the tension on the braid is even and that it is not too loose. Continue your braid on the right side. You will do this by taking small sections of hair and adding them to the right section of your divided hair. Pick up a small section of hair from the right side of your head, immediately below the braided section.

Add the new hair to the section of hair that you are holding in your right hand. Then cross this right section over the center section of hair. Pull the section tight at the end of each cross over to ensure that the braid stays neatly defined with even tension. Continue your braid on the left side. This will follow the same method you used on the right side. Pick up a small section of hair from the left side of your head, just below the braid.

This section should be parallel to and the same size as the section you picked up on your right side. Add it to the hair that you are holding in your left hand. Cross it over the center section of hair.

Repeat this process, alternating between left and right sides. Continue to pick up extra hair before crossing the sections into your braid. This incorporates the hair not already in the braid, creating a cohesive braid. Make sure you take even strands on each side of your head. This will ensure that your braid will be even and straight in the back. The braid should follow the center of your head, from the front hair line to the nape of the neck. If you have longer hair, run your fingers down each the section of hair to ensure that tangling does not occur as you go.

Braid your remaining hair. You will use a traditional braid once all the hair down to the nape of your neck is incorporated into the three sections you started with. When you have no more hair to braid, tie the end with a hair tie.

If you have long hair, you will need to bring your braid over your shoulder to complete it. Try variations of this braid. You can do pigtail french braids by splitting your hair into 2 sections with a hair pick and braiding them individually. You can also braid from your part down the side of your head. This is called a french lace braid. This removes tangles and makes braiding easier.

If you don't have longer hair, you can use hair extensions to make this braid easier. Make sure there are no tangles or knots in your hair before you start the braid. Use a regular hair brush or comb to do this step.

It is much simpler to do a side fishtail braid when you are first learning. The multi-layered construction makes it difficult to do behind your back when you are not familiar with the process. Part your hair into two sections.

Use a hair pick or comb to part your hair down the middle, dividing it into 2 large sections at the base of your skull. If you want, you can brush out each of these sections to ensure that the hair is smooth and well divided. This is different from traditional and french braids, which use 3 sections of hair.

Use your index finger to separate this smaller section of hair from the larger one on the right. Cross this smaller section of hair over the right section of hair and tuck it behind the left section of hair. Do the same for the left side. You will need to hold both left sections with your left hand and both right sections with your right hand.

To get the best results, try not to rush this braid. Instead, work slowly and be careful not to drop the smaller strands of hair as you braid. This varies from the other braids because you work with two stable pieces while creating the third strand each time instead of having three stable strands throughout the steps.

For a more intricate braid, use smaller strands of hair. Continue braiding your hair following the last step. Alternate sides as you go along.

Merge this piece of hair with the large section in your left hand. Cross the small, outside left section into the center. Merge this small left section into the larger right section. Make sure to pull the strands tight. This will ensure a tight, neat braid.

Repeat this process until all of your hair is braided. Secure the braid at the end with a hair elastic. You can use small clear elastics or a thicker colored style if you want. For a messier braid, gently run your fingers along the braids and pull small strands out to create a flyaway look.

Laura Martin Licensed Cosmetologist. Curly hair is great for braiding. Before you begin, dampen the hair slightly and add some leave-in conditioner to help control the curls as you work. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 6.

Whenever I try to do a french braid my hair puffs out. What should I do? This puffing out is a result of a lack of tension. As you braid, keep your hands close to the scalp and pull down and back on the braid. Not Helpful 0 Helpful 5. That is entirely up to you but if you practice daily, you'll probably get the hang of it within a week. Try it and see. Not Helpful 28 Helpful In some cases, wetting your hair before braiding can actually increase the likelihood of breakage.

That being said, in my experience, dampening my hair can make it easier to tuck in loose strands. This is also the ideal method if you want wavy hair. Braiding your hair while damp will create waves when it dries.

Not Helpful 4 Helpful Not Helpful 19 Helpful Traditional braids are easy to incorporate into other styles. You can braid a tiny accent braid that hangs loose, or you can pin your accent braid to create a headband. You can also dress up a ponytail by braiding it into a traditional braid.

You can braid all or part of your hair, so experiment to see which styles you like! Comb out any knots. French braiding can be particularly tricky if your hair is tangled, so take a few minutes to remove knots with a brush or wide-toothed comb. Part out your starter section. For a traditional French braid, this is probably the front section of your hair, that's closest to your forehead and temples. You don't have to start a French braid at the top of your head.

It's the easiest way to learn, but theoretically you could start a French braid anywhere. Just make sure you're including the hair above your ears in your starter section if you decide to move down the head.

You can create multiple French braids on your hair using several parts. If you have short hair, it may be easier to make two medium braids rather than one large one. Separate your starter section into three equal sections. These three strands will make up the beginning of the braid. The real trick to French braiding is keeping your three sections evenly sized as you braid.

Give yourself a solid head start by making sure your strands are equal to begin with. Make sure the strands start from the same row of hair, rather than staggered areas. Keeping the three strands close together will also be helpful. Hold the three strands in your hands. Grasping the strands correctly will help you braid neatly and quickly. Though you might find another way that's more comfortable for you, here's a basic beginning grip: Grasp the left strand in your left hand.

Grasp the center strand between the thumb and index finger of your right hand. Grasp the right strand between your right palm and the last three fingers of your right hand. Move the right strand to the center. Here's how to shift the right strand without completely losing your hold on the braid: With the last three fingers of your left hand, grip the left strand between your fingers and your palm. This should free up your left thumb and index finger. With your left thumb and index finger, reach over the center strand and grab the right strand.

You should now have two strands in your left hand and one in your right hand. Move the left strand to the center. This will be the same process as the previous step, mirrored. With the last three fingers of your right hand, grip the right strand between your fingers and your palm. This should free up your right thumb and index finger. With your right thumb and index finger, reach over the center strand and grab the left strand. You should now have two strands in your right hand and one in your left hand.

Add hair to the right strand. Up until now, you've done a regular braid. This is where the "French" part of the process comes in. It might take you a few tries to get it right, but it's easier once you're comfortable with the grip.

Let go of the center strand, and allow it to hang between the left and right strands. You should be able to tell it apart from the rest of your hair — it'll be slightly elevated above the hair that hasn't been braided yet. Grip the left strand between the last three fingers of your left hand and your left palm and grab the right strand with your left thumb and index finger. Your right hand should now be free. Using your right hand, pull up a small section of unbraided hair from the right side of your head.

Slide your thumb against your scalp just below the section, gathering a small section of hair. Grab this new section with your left thumb and index finger to add it to the right strand of the braid.

Pick up the center strand of the braid again. Grab it with your right hand, and move it to the right, making it your new right strand.

The section you added hair to, between your left thumb and index finger, is the new center strand. Add hair to the left strand. This process will be just like the previous step, but using opposite sides: Let go of the center strand. Again, it will hang between the left and right strands. Grip the right strand between the last three fingers of your right hand and your right palm. Grab the left strand with your right thumb and index finger.

Your left hand should now be free. Using your left hand, pull up a small section of unbraided hair from the left side of your head. Slide your thumb along your scalp in the same manner you did on the other side of your head, gathering the same amount of hair to add to the left section.

Grab the new section with your right thumb and index finger to add it to the left section of the braid. Grab it with your left hand, and move it to the left, making it your new left strand. The section you added hair to, between your right thumb and index finger, is the new center strand. Continue braiding in this pattern. You will run out of new hair to add into the braid when you reach the nape of your neck, at which point you can finish with a regular braid.

To keep the braid looking as neat as possible, create parallel lines on each side of your head as you gather sections of hair.

This helps keep your sections about the same size as you finish your braid. Do a basic braid on the rest of the hair. Continue doing a regular three-strand braid with the hair that's still loose.

Use a hair tie the same color as your hair, or one that is translucent so that it blends in. Avoid rubber bands, which can damage your hair and be difficult to remove. Hairspray or spray gel can help your French braid from developing flyaways as the day goes on. If you're going to add extra embellishment to your hair, hairspray it first.

This will prevent flaky residue from getting on your barrettes or ribbons. Using shine serum will help to keep your hair looking smooth and soft, if it has the tendency to be rough and dry looking.

For some extra flair, tie a colorful ribbon in a bow at the end of your braid. Adding a pretty brooch or multiple hair pins along the braid is a great way to add a bit of glam to your look. Separate your hair into two even sections. A fishtail braid looks like it's made of several small strands, but surprisingly there are only two primary sections. For a neat braid, use a fine-toothed comb to make a straight part down the middle of your head, from forehead to nape. For a more tousled, Katniss Everdeen-inspired look, just part your hair with your hands and separate into two sections that seem somewhat even.

You can fishtail your hair when it is either wet or dry. Pull a small strand of hair from the left section into the right section. Once you get this grip down, you'll be able to do it for the whole braid. Hold the right section of hair in your right hand. Drop the left section and let it hang loose. Because you're only working with two sections, you don't need to worry about it mixing with another part of the braid.

Using your left hand, pull up a small strand of hair from the leftmost side of the left section. That is, from the side of the left section of hair that's closest to your ear. Grab the small strand of hair from the left section with your right hand, incorporating it into the right section of the braid.

Hold the left section of hair in your left hand again. As you pick it back up, you can run your fingers through the section to smooth out any knots and tighten up the braid. Pull a small strand of hair from the right section into the left section.

This is just like the previous step, but mirrored. For a more intricate-looking braid, pull up smaller strands of hair. For a quicker braid, grab larger sections.

Hold the left section of hair in your left hand. Drop the right section and let it hang loose. Again, because you're only working with two primary sections, there's no need to worry about mixing strands. If your braid gets too long while braiding down your back, pull your hair over your shoulder and continue the steps with the hair in front of you. Tie with a hair tie at the bottom. Make sure the hair tie is tight. If it is too loose sections of your braid will come out. Brush your hair thoroughly.

This will make the braid smooth and neat. This will also cut down on tangling as you braid. It will be difficult to pull your hair into sections for a braid if it is tangled.

Smoother hair is easier to braid and this will prevent a messy looking style. Remember to avoid braiding wet hair or using too much product. If you are having trouble with your hair slipping out of the braid, you can apply a dry shampoo though. Section off an area of hair at the front of the scalp on the top of your head. Use a hair pick or comb to pick up the section of hair at the top of your head. The French braid is more complicated than the traditional braid because the braid starts at the top of your head, then incrementally adds hair from the rest of your head as you work your way down the braid.

This first section should extend from your temples to the top of your head. You can also separate this section of hair by pulling your hair back along the side of your head from your temples to the back, using your thumbs. Brush this section of hair back from your face to smooth it out. Divide the section at the front of your head for braiding. Split the hair into three sections, holding the hair high on your head. Hold one section in one hand and two in the other, keeping them separated by your index finger.

It is often helpful to hold two sections in your left hand and one in your right hand. Make sure your hold is firm on the three sections. Cross the right section over the center section to start. Cross the left section over the section that is now in the center, as if you were doing a traditional braid.

This is the start of your braid. It should begin high on the crown of your head and look like a traditional braid. Pull the sections tight to make sure the tension on the braid is even and that it is not too loose.

Continue your braid on the right side. You will do this by taking small sections of hair and adding them to the right section of your divided hair.

Pick up a small section of hair from the right side of your head, immediately below the braided section. Add the new hair to the section of hair that you are holding in your right hand. Then cross this right section over the center section of hair.

Pull the section tight at the end of each cross over to ensure that the braid stays neatly defined with even tension. Continue your braid on the left side. This will follow the same method you used on the right side. Pick up a small section of hair from the left side of your head, just below the braid. This section should be parallel to and the same size as the section you picked up on your right side. Add it to the hair that you are holding in your left hand.

Cross it over the center section of hair. Repeat this process, alternating between left and right sides. Continue to pick up extra hair before crossing the sections into your braid. This incorporates the hair not already in the braid, creating a cohesive braid. Make sure you take even strands on each side of your head. This will ensure that your braid will be even and straight in the back.

The braid should follow the center of your head, from the front hair line to the nape of the neck. If you have longer hair, run your fingers down each the section of hair to ensure that tangling does not occur as you go. Braid your remaining hair. You will use a traditional braid once all the hair down to the nape of your neck is incorporated into the three sections you started with.

When you have no more hair to braid, tie the end with a hair tie. If you have long hair, you will need to bring your braid over your shoulder to complete it. Try variations of this braid. You can do pigtail french braids by splitting your hair into 2 sections with a hair pick and braiding them individually.

You can also braid from your part down the side of your head. This is called a french lace braid. This removes tangles and makes braiding easier. If you don't have longer hair, you can use hair extensions to make this braid easier. Make sure there are no tangles or knots in your hair before you start the braid.

Use a regular hair brush or comb to do this step. It is much simpler to do a side fishtail braid when you are first learning. The multi-layered construction makes it difficult to do behind your back when you are not familiar with the process. Part your hair into two sections.

Use a hair pick or comb to part your hair down the middle, dividing it into 2 large sections at the base of your skull. If you want, you can brush out each of these sections to ensure that the hair is smooth and well divided. This is different from traditional and french braids, which use 3 sections of hair. Use your index finger to separate this smaller section of hair from the larger one on the right. Cross this smaller section of hair over the right section of hair and tuck it behind the left section of hair.

Do the same for the left side. You will need to hold both left sections with your left hand and both right sections with your right hand. To get the best results, try not to rush this braid. Instead, work slowly and be careful not to drop the smaller strands of hair as you braid. This varies from the other braids because you work with two stable pieces while creating the third strand each time instead of having three stable strands throughout the steps.

For a more intricate braid, use smaller strands of hair. Continue braiding your hair following the last step. Alternate sides as you go along. Merge this piece of hair with the large section in your left hand.

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